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Sagaing is an important religious and monastic center of Myanmar with lots of Buddhist monasteries and a monastic hospital. This city was the capital of the short-lived Sagaing Kingdom (1315–1364), one of the minor kingdoms that thrived after the fall of Bagan. During the Ava period (1364–1555), it belonged to the crown prince or senior princes. Sagaing briefly became the royal capital between 1760 and 1763 in the reign of King Naungdawgyi.

Published in Inwa and Sagaing

Bagaya Kyaung was entirely built of teak wood during the reign of King Bagyidaw in 1834. Besides being a monastery, it was also used as a palace, as it can be clearly identified by the existence of the tower, a typical secular feature of royal palaces.

Published in Inwa and Sagaing

Maha Aungmye Bonzan (or Maha Aung Myay Bonzan) is the brick monastery of Queen Nanmadaw Me Nu, built for royal abbots Nyaunggan Sayadaw U Po and U Bok. Thus it is also called as Me Nu Ok Kyaung, literally meaning the brick (ok) monastery (kyaung) of Queen Me Nu. She was the chief queen of King Bagyidaw of Konbaung dynasty of Burma from 1819 to 1837.

Published in Inwa and Sagaing

The gilded stupa of  Kuthodaw Pagoda was modeled after Shwezigon Pagoda at Nyaung-U near Bagan. Construction of the building was begun in 1857 by King Mindon, who wanted to leave a great work by merit and thus decided to create the world's largest book around the central stupa.

Published in Mandalay

Shwenandaw Kyaung is a fine example of 19th century Burmese teak wood architecture.

Published in Mandalay

Most monuments of Bagan don't have a specific name and can only be identified with their unique numbers. Pagoda No. 2100 belongs to these anonymous monuments, nothing is known about its founder or construction date. Again, the stunning panoramic view of North-Bagan especially at sunset from the terrace of the building is the real attraction.

Published in Bagan

King Anawrahta was a famous king of Bagan (1044-1077) who turned a small principality in Upper Burma into the first Burmese Empire. His troops ventured into Lower Burma and occupied the Mon kingdom of Thaton by 1057. Shwesandaw paya was erected just after his victory and became the center of his newly empowered kingdom.

Published in Bagan

Sulamani pahto is one of Bagan's most attractive temples with its two-storey pyramid-like brick architecture. It combines horizontal planes of the early period with the vertical lines of the middle. Founder of the temple was King Narapatisithu, ruler of Bagan from 1173 to 1210. Construction works started about 1181 and the temple got the name “Crowning jewel”. Like several other temples of Bagan, it was hit by the 1975 earthquake but was restored to its former glory since that time.

Published in Bagan

Shwegugyi paya is an example of Bagan architecture of the middle period of the empire. It was built by King Alaungsithu around 1131, who ruled from 1113 to 1167.

Published in Bagan

Recent studies revealed that Nanpaya temple was built by King Manuha's grand-nephew, Prince Naga Thaman in the late 11th century.

Published in Bagan
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